Blog

Welcome to the official blog of Riding-Iceland, Iceland's premiere Horse Trekking tour company. Learn more about our amazing tours, Icelandic horses, riding tips, Iceland travel tips and much more. We hope you enjoy!

Changes at Riding Iceland

29.10 2015

Riding Iceland is now entering it’s 6th year of operations and has established itself as the leading provider of horse riding tours in Iceland. We are currently operating from 5 different locations offering multi-day horse riding tours covering the whole of Iceland along with shorter day tours and other activities. During our time of operation we have been extremely well received as is clearly shown in how many of our customers choose to return to ride with us year after year. On a typical tour it is not uncommon that over half of the guests are there for their second…

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Mist of Oblivion

16.04 2015

Look at this path that has been carved into the rock hard basalt by the hooves of thousands of horses through the centuries. How many hoofbeats would this take?  Once this was a busy route for riders with strings of pack horses carrying loads of stockfish from the fishing villages of the Reykjanes peninsula but now this route is hardly travelled as can be seen by the fragile moss that slowly progresses to cover it and submit it to the mist of oblivion. We ride to remember

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The Five Gaits of the Icelandic Horse Make it a Breed Apart

19.02 2015

All horse breeds have three natural gaits — the walk, the trot, and the gallop. A natural gait is one that is performed by inherent, natural impulse and without training. Some horse breeds canter naturally, but not all. Few horse breeds have more than four gaits. The Icelandic Horse is a breed apart from all other horse breeds, in more than a few aspects, and among its most celebrated features is its five natural, and unique gaits: the walk, the trot, the canter, the tölt, and the flying pace. The Walk is a slow and natural four-beated gait, during which…

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The Icelandic Horse Is A 1000-Year-Old Purebred

19.02 2015

You can find Icelandic Horses outside of Iceland, but those horses are not allowed to return to their native country. Iceland has very strict rules regarding its exclusive breed of horse, which makes the Icelandic one of the most purest bred horses in the world — and it’s been that way for over 1000 years. The Icelandic Horse, along with only a handful of the world’s rare breeds, are the closest tie we have to the first domesticated horses. The Vikings began to settle permanently in Iceland from 874 – 930 AD. They arrived in small boats, and because of…

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Pilgrimage - Riding trails of Iceland

17.02 2015

Riding trails around Iceland, both in the populated areas and up in the highlands, are an important and perhaps underestimated part of the history and culture of Icelanders. Many of these trails were discovered soon after settlement in the 9th century and served a major role in the formation of the Icelandic Commonwealth.  Other trails were established by sheep herders or by other necessities in the nations’ struggle for existence throughout the centuries.  We should also keep in mind that the characteristics of the Icelandic horse were shaped first and foremost by these trails, as the main measure of the quality of a horse used to…

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Iceland’s Highlands Are Full of Treasures

23.01 2015

The Vikings of old rode their horses, or walked alongside them to get from here to there. Always, man and horse relied upon one another for survival, often for companionship. Those ancient Icelanders traversed a landscape that could take a life at any moment, within the blink of an eye. Once a year every chieftain of Iceland journeyed from his settlement to Þingvellir to participate in the Alþingi, the centralized parliament that governed the country. At times travelers  took out-of-the-way routes nearer the flatter, more lush landscape of the coast to avoid the mountainous and barren interior—a highland believed to…

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Riding Horseback Across North Iceland is Magic

01.01 2015

Four-wheel drive super-Jeeps are exciting, but for a pure experience of true Iceland magic you must discover the places inaccessible by mechanized travel. Hiking and backpacking allow you to travel unbeaten paths, and both slow the pace for an intimate experience of a land where fire and ice mingle, but on the back of a horse you can experience the same intimacy as a journey by foot, and with even more excitement than if you travelled on four wheels. What’s more, the Icelandic horse is part of the magic that makes Iceland one of the most mesmerizing adventures on earth.…

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The Singularity of the Icelandic Horse

01.01 2015

Ingolf Arnarsson became the first permanent settler in Iceland, when he established Reykjavik, in 874 AD. Onboard his longboat, he had his family, his possessions, and his livestock. Over the next sixty years, other Vikings settled in Iceland, and they, too, brought along their families, possessions, and livestock, among which were horses, the one animal that, in the beginning years of establishing the snowy island as an independent republic, became the most important. With a stout, sure-footed horse, the early Icelanders could plow their fields, transport wares and supplies, and could traverse a world rough enough to kill anyone who…

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